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Old 02-01-2010, 11:35 PM
mattslc mattslc is offline
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Default Securing power cables

I'm looking for a way to secure the power cables to several singly-fed Cisco 3750s that are installed in open ended racks in our data center so that if they're bumped the cables don't come out. I've looked all over for a product specifically designed for this but all I seem to find are cheap looking adhesive cable mounts. Anyone have any tips?
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Old 02-02-2010, 01:13 AM
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KenB KenB is offline
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A couple dabs of hot glue would help prevent accidental disconnection, but could be cut to allow the cords to be removed for <insert your reason here>. If you can't think of a reason the cords should be removable, then epoxy them in.

Ken
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Old 02-02-2010, 08:29 PM
raid raid is offline
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I would always recommend using a cable tie to secure the power cord to the equipment chassis. The major advantage here is that the cord can be removed if required but any load on the cord will not dislodge the connector. This method will prevent accidental removal.

Hope this helps
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Old 02-02-2010, 09:50 PM
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Keith Keith is offline
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Here is a 3 step solution to solve this issue. It is extremely overkill in some regards.

1) Install a lacing bar at the back of the rack in order to zip tie the cord to it (put the cable in a loop before tieing).
2) Install a sticky zip tie mount on to the switch (you can get decent brands; Panduit makes a pretty decent mount if you prep the surface with a cleaning solvent first).
3) Install an RPS to the switch. For like $750 you can add a 2nd power supply that will supply power to 6 devices via the DC input inlet.

I could also recommend a 4th step which is to make it so people aren't walking in to the switches. I would have to kick a person out of my datacenter if they were stupid enough to walk in to a rack of switches! If the stupid people cannot be removed, put a couple pylons behind the switches.

I guess if you are daring enough, you could get a zip tie mount that can be attached with a screw and use a really really tiny self tapping screw to put a really really tiny hole in the back of the switch.
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Old 02-03-2010, 08:42 PM
raid raid is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith View Post
2) Install a sticky zip tie mount on to the switch (you can get decent brands; Panduit makes a pretty decent mount if you prep the surface with a cleaning solvent first)..
Because of the heat at the back of a rack the sticky mounts don't last.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith View Post
3) Install an RPS to the switch. For like $750 you can add a 2nd power supply that will supply power to 6 devices via the DC input inlet.
The Cisco RPS does have limitations and users need to be aware of these limitation before deploying them. The units that I have used can only supply power to one of the six power connections at any one time. This means that a power failure must be limited to one 3750 or you will lose all of them. Most common failure is that you have a power supply fail in a Cisco switch and and it trips a rack breaker. By using one common RPS for a number of 3750's you then lose power to all.

Not a happy day....
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Old 02-03-2010, 09:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raid View Post
Because of the heat at the back of a rack the sticky mounts don't last.
I realise the concern for heat but I believe he is specifying a 2-post rack; hopefully it is not too hot behind a 2-post rack to melt a decent zip-tie mount. The mounts I use are made by Panduit and are called the "Super-Grip". They are indoor/outdoor mounts that claim to adhere up to 180 degrees farenhuit. I will say that some textured surfaces do not hold the mounts very well.

In the event that you cannot get a mount to stick, I recommend going with a very simple solution that just dawned on me. You could take 2 fairly long pieces of electrical tape and create an "X" pattern around the power cord and on to the chassis. If this thing allows me to post a picture of the concept, I will upload it. I tested it out in my lab, a few minutes ago, and it held the cable in fairly well. I tried to pull it straight out and it held in place.
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